About Me

Hi there! My name is Pradip Basnet. Currently, I am a postdoctoral fellow in Prof. Eric M. Vogel’s group in the School of Materials Science and Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology (GT). My research focuses on designing, fabricating, and characterizing the metal oxides based memristors for the resistive memory (RRAM) application. This is a MURI funded research is performed in collaboration with four professors at GT and two research groups at the University of Binghamton, NY.

I was born and raised in Nepal, and I came to the USA in Aug 2008 to join the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth  (UMassD) as a Master student. I received my Master’s degree in Physics in May 2010 (from UMassD with a thesis in Astrophysics). Then, I joined the Department of Physics and Astronomy at University of Georgia (UGA), Athens in Aug 2010 as a doctoral student. I defended my Ph.D. in Physics in May 2015 under the supervision of Prof. Yiping Zhao. During my doctoral research at the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center at UGA, I focused on studying the catalytic, photocatalytic, and photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of visible light active photocatalysts with a particular focus on design, fabrication, and characterization of visible light active metal oxides (MOs). I have studied structural, optical, and electronic properties of various MOs and their composites (for e.g. α-Fe2O3, WO3, Ag-TiO2, Fe2O3-TiO2, CuxO (x = 1, 2), CuBi2O4, and CuxO-TiO2), and have characterized for the environmental remediation (for e.g. dye adsorption and antimicrobial), gas sensing, and clean energy generation via water splitting.

In June 2016, I joined the UGA as an Educational Program Specialist, where I worked on a Georgia Research Alliance (GRA) project. The project goal was to develop a multiplexed detection of the respiratory viruses using a combination of silver nanorods (AgNRs) surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) test substrates and a handheld Raman spectrometer. Being a multidisciplinary project, it required my involvement in designing and developing the SERS active substrates, and understanding of processes such as handling and extracting viral RNA, functionalization of AgNRs with labels such as Oligonucleotides, optimizing hybridization reactions, data acquisition, analysis and interpretation using chemometric methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The project collaborated with UGA professors Dr. Yiping Zhao from the Department of Physics and Dr. Ralph Tripp from the Department of Infectious Diseases and Argent Diagnostics Inc (ADI). The ADI is an early stage private company affiliated to UGA. Prior to the GRA grant, I worked at ADI as a Consulting Research Scientist and my main role was to develop a SERS based point-of-care (POC) device for measles virus (MeV) detection by using a similar combination of AgNRs and a handheld Raman spectrometer. This project was funded by a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).