Welcome

 

I am a postdoctoral fellow at the George Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. My current research involves design for additive manufacturing (DFAM). More specifically, I am developing a formal ontology to represent a knowledge base that captures the rules specific to DFAM and guides users through the design process in a way that helps them seize the opportunities DFAM provide. One example is part consolidation.

I received my Ph.D. at 2015 in mechanical engineering from Arizona State University, and an MS degree in Product Development from Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden at 2010. My BS degree was in manufacturing engineering from Amir Kabir Institute of Technology in Tehran, Iran. My Ph.D. dissertation was about employing, among other analysis methods, machine learning techniques to understand the relation between problem formulation and creativity in design. My Masters’ thesis was on utilizing a Product Data Management system in an engineer-to-order process for model-based system designs. For my bachelors thesis, I studied the low pressure die casting process of an aluminum cylinder head of a small sedan.

I am interested in creativity in design. Creative design is one of the main drivers of innovation and it can help us overcome global challenges. I believe that we can find ways to be more creative in design. We should possess an array of analytic and synthesizing skills, as well as understanding and searching for problems which affect us all. I try to do that myself. I find my educational and professional experience an interesting mix. I am a mechanical engineer with a passion for programming and database management. I do not shy away from field psychology and interactions with humans, and I have had first-hand experience with how quality engineering and business excellence drive a modern organization.

I am an avid movie buff; during my undergrad years I used to be a syndicated film critic. I play the lute (the Middle Eastern version though which is called Oud), terribly, though I still can enjoy it and wish I could practice more.